That Darn Check Engine Light

That Darn Check Engine Light

The Top 3 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Panic When Your Check Engine Light Comes On

Genins Check Engine LightIt’s every car owner’s worst nightmare: the dreaded check engine light.

On average, 10% of drivers will drive with their check engine lights on at any given time — and 50% of these drivers will ignore their check engine lights for more than three months. You definitely don’t want to ignore your check engine light for that long, it might not be the emergency crisis that other people have told you it is.

If your check engine light does come on, it’s usually no reason to panic. Chances are, it’s not the emergency you think it is, and an auto maintenance service will be able to fix the problem. Here are the three biggest reasons why it’s not worth it to panic when you notice your check engine light has turned on:

It may just be your gas cap
If your gas cap is loose, missing or damaged, gasoline may be evaporating from your gas tank — which will trigger your check engine light. It’s estimated that faulty gas caps cause a shocking 147 million gallons of gas to evaporate from gas tanks each year, meaning it’s a good idea to get your gas cap repaired sooner rather than later. Best of all? Fixing a loose or damaged gas cap is fairly inexpensive.

Auto repair shops can diagnose the problem
Check engine lights are one of the most common car problems we experience. As a result, any certified auto maintenance service technician will be able to easily determine the cause of your check engine light and offer a simple, inexpensive fix. It’s no surprise that the U.S. auto repair industry generates $58 billion in annual revenues, given this.

Check engine lights aren’t usually an emergency
Compared to other dashboard lights like your oil light — which indicates you need a repair immediately — the check engine light shouldn’t be thought of as an emergency. Chances are, you can drive for a few more miles, or even a few more days, with your check engine light on. However, don’t ignore the light completely. You should always see a certified mechanic if your check engine light appears.

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